July302014
8PM
July292014
libutron:

Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)
Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.
Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.
Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

libutron:

Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)

Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.

Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.

Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

(via rhamphotheca)

frog 

8PM
rhamphotheca:

The  Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) is one of the most endangered amphibians in North America, now found only in captivity and one protected lake refuge… (read more)
photo: USFWS, Sara Armstrong
(via: The Scientist)

rhamphotheca:

The Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) is one of the most endangered amphibians in North America, now found only in captivity and one protected lake refuge… (read more)

photo: USFWS, Sara Armstrong

(via: The Scientist)

frog 

July282014
rhamphotheca:

An angry mob of  Northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens) goes apeshit and ravages the countryside of Indiana.
photo by Tom Koerner/USFWS
(via: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Midwest Region)

rhamphotheca:

An angry mob of Northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens) goes apeshit and ravages the countryside of Indiana.

photo by Tom Koerner/USFWS

(via: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Midwest Region)

frog 

8PM
6PM
July272014
8PM
libutron:

So We Finally Meet the Fringed Leaf Frog | ©Ryan L. Lynch
An amazing portrait of a Fringed Leaf Frog, Cruziohyla craspedopus (Hylidae) photographed by Ryan Lynch after 12 years of working as a Biologist in Ecuador.
This is a fairly large frog reaching up to 80mm in males and 87mm in females, the coloration is outstanding, ranging from green through to blue and even purple, which is mottled with pale blue patches. The underside is bright yellow and the flanks are broken up with black lines. The inner leg matches the flanks but they are only visable when the frog is mobile. 
C. craspedopus is a very elusive frog, rarely seen by humans, living high up in the canopy, so more than most frogs.
[Source]

libutron:

So We Finally Meet the Fringed Leaf Frog | ©Ryan L. Lynch

An amazing portrait of a Fringed Leaf Frog, Cruziohyla craspedopus (Hylidae) photographed by Ryan Lynch after 12 years of working as a Biologist in Ecuador.

This is a fairly large frog reaching up to 80mm in males and 87mm in females, the coloration is outstanding, ranging from green through to blue and even purple, which is mottled with pale blue patches. The underside is bright yellow and the flanks are broken up with black lines. The inner leg matches the flanks but they are only visable when the frog is mobile. 

C. craspedopus is a very elusive frog, rarely seen by humans, living high up in the canopy, so more than most frogs.

[Source]

(via inthecreek)

frog 

July262014
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